Oscar Wilde's "Salome"

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salome-beardsley01.jpg
The Kiss
Illust. for Salome
Aubrey Beardley 1894
"She is like a woman rising from a tomb. She is like a dead woman. One might fancy she was looking for dead things." — Salome, by Oscar Wilde

This vision of Salome remains more or less intact to the present day. Exemplified in Oscar Wilde's "Salome" of 1894, which was so iconic and archetypal that almost any version of Salome that has been done in the past hundred years is either a direct descendent — or a bastard child. Wilde explored the beauty of heightened biblical language to exquisite effect. The rhythm of the play reverberates long after the words were spoke. Oscar doesn┬╣t invent anything new; he merely draws on centuries of church repressed sex, expressed thru the pantomime of ritual assassinations. Especially poignant to the Victorian English, as they were the most socially repressed of all.

Salome
The Dancer's Reward
Illust. by Aubrey Beardsley
Salome
Salome
Pierre Bonnaud c. 1900
Salome
Salome
Salome
Salome
Salome
Maud Allen
as Salomé

Alla Nazimova produced and starred in the first film adaptation of Wilde's play, the sets and costumes inspired by Beardsley's illustrations. Silent.

Salome
Lobby Card for Nazimova's adaptation of Wilde's Salome, 1923
Salome
Nazimova as Salome
Salome
Nazimova as Salome
Salome
Nazimova as Salome
Salome
Nazimova as Salome
Salome
Nazimova as Salome


Links:
Oscar Wilde's "Salome" E-Texts
Beardsley's Salome Illustrations
Alla Nazimova's Salome


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About this Entry

This page contains a single entry by Kallisti published on September 15, 2006 3:26 PM.

Huysman on Gustave Moreau's "Salome" was the previous entry in this blog.

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